Leadership

Entrepreneurs are Rocking Work/Life Balance

Study shows business-owners are increasingly satisfied with their ability to juggle work and home lives

Written by Deborah Aarts

Most entrepreneurs go into business at least in part because they want to set their own agendas. The good news is, they’re doing a pretty good job of it.

An international study of 26,000 professionals conducted by Regus, which provides flexible workspaces for business clients, reveals that 71% of Canadian entrepreneurs are more satisfied with their work/life balance than they were last year.

Why the improvement? It has to do with changing attitudes towards work and the widespread availability of new work-anywhere technology, explains Wes Lenci, vice-president of Regus Canada. Because entrepreneurs tend to be more nimble than their corporate counterparts, he says, they’re quicker to restructure their organizations in ways that allow themselves—and their employees—to apply more flexible work habits, thereby freeing time for family, friends, hobbies, downtime and whatever else is needed to recharge the batteries.

Read: Classic Tips on How to Improve Work/Life Balance

“Entrepreneurs are very quick to take advantage of technologies and mechanisms that they can use to make themselves more efficient,” Lenci tells PROFIT.

Anything that facilitates more time to pursue the dividends of the entrepreneurial life.

Read: Even More Work/Life Balance Boosters

What about staff?

Bosses aren’t the only ones doing a better job achieving work/life balance. Employees are, too—especially if they’re younger. The Regus study shows that 75% of Gen X and Gen Y workers are satisfied with their ability to juggle their work and home lives. Jut 65% of boomers, by contrast, can say the same.

Is that just because older employees are too busy with their noses to the grindstone to focus on non-work pursuits? Not necessarily. Nearly 80% of younger workers say they’re more satisfied with their productivity levels than before—compared with just 68% among the older cohort.

Read: Why Bosses Blow it With Gen Y

Gen X and Gen Y workers are energized by flexible work arrangements, Lenci explains. And they think the oldest generation’s attachment to long hours at the office is a relic. “They’ve seen their parents and aunts and uncles go to a job for 20-some years, put in the time, follow the rules, and not get home until 7:30 or 8:30 at night,” he says. “They’re trying to break free of that.

“They want to work somewhere they can work whenever they want, 24/7. They have strong business motivations, but they want to do it on their own time,” Lenci continues. “Anything traditional with the younger generations doesn’t really work.”

Originally appeared on PROFITguide.com